Could Breastfeeding Hurt Your Child? Fran Drescher Thinks So

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(Photo by Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images)

(Photo by Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images)

101.9 Lite FM Features

In a recent radio with 94.7 Fresh FM in Washington DC, Fran Drescher wasn’t interested in talking about her new movie Hotel Transylvania, but about a topic that she feels could really use the press.

The uterine cancer survivor and activist, who started the organization Cancer Schmancer, wanted to talk about the downside of breastfeeding.

“American women have the highest amount of flame retardant in their breast milk,” she said. “This is something that is not really talked about. Breasts are like big sponges.”

Drescher explained over 90 percent of all cancers we get are environmentally instigated and noted that flame retardant is found in nearly everyone’s home. According to the American Home Furnishings Alliance, more than 80 percent of furniture sold in the U.S. contains foam treated with flame retardant chemicals.

The Nanny star said she wanted to bring to light the topic because, “we’re selling these women that breast milk is the second coming,” but it could be dangerous to young children. Drescher believes that the recent rise in diagnosed cases of autism and other learning disabilities could even be linked to infected breast milk. 

A recent study found that flame retardent chemicals unfortunately can be absorbed by the body turning up in “household dust and in human blood and breast milk,” according to NPR. Chemists even found a connection between the chemicals and abnormal brain development in humans, but did not go as far as saying flame retardent causes cancer. 

Drescher advised that pregnant women go to their doctor and take a urine test to check the chemical levels found in their bloodstream. She also said that new mothers should have their breast milk tested for metals and other chemicals.

The actress was diagnosed with uterine cancer in 2000 after being misdiagnosed with peri-menopausal condition and later told her story in the 2002 book, Cancer Schmancer. She has been in remission for nearly 12 years.

-Shannon Carlin, CBS Local

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